Posts

9
Jul

Melissa Brisman Speaks About Legal Issues Surrounding Surrogacy – Web TV: July, 9, 2014

by

Melissa Brisman, Reproductive Lawyer - Guest Blog Post on CNY Fertility CenterWatch Melissa Brisman speak tonight on the legal issues surrounding surrogacy nationwide. Live tonight 7/9 at 6pm EST on Arise America with Debbye Turner Bell. Please tune in! 

Watch live on www.Arise.tv 
PROGRAM: Arise America with Debbye Turner Bell 
GUEST: Melissa Brisman, Esq. 
TOPIC: Legal Issues Surrounding Surrogacy Nationwide 
AIR TIME: 6pm – 7pm EST 

~~

Melissa B. Brisman, Esq., LLC
One Paragon Drive, Suite 158
Montvale, NJ 07645
201-505-0099
201-505-0097 Fax
www.reproductivelawyer.com

Melissa B. Brisman, Owner
Reproductive Possibilities, LLC and Surrogate Fund Management, LLC
One Paragon Drive, Suite 160
Montvale, NJ 07645
Phone: 201-505-0078
Fax:  201-505-0994
www.reproductivepossibilities.com

www.surrogatefundmanagement.com

Follow her on Twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/melissabrisman
Follow her on Facebook @ Melissa Brisman

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If you are interested in an initial fertility consultation with CNY Fertility Centers either over the phone (if you live out of the NY State region) or in-office, please call our toll-free number at 800.539.9870 or request a consult here.

If you have questions or comments relating to this post, please contact our office.
17
Jan

Intra-uterine hCG at Embryo Transfer: “Jump-Starting” the Implantation Process

by

Dr Robert Greene - CNY Fertility CenterDuring the IVF process, the emphasis has traditionally been on creating the best possible embryos for transfer. Although this embryo based approach has lead to a steady improvement in pregnancy rates for IVF patients; success rates have reached a plateau during the last decade. It seems appropriate therefore that we now step back and devote similar efforts to bolster implantation by improving the receptivity of a woman’s uterus. Such was the recommendation of a 2006 review article [r1] that suggested in its title that the “…endometrium is a fertility determining factor.” Yet only recently have practical ideas verified how we can optimize the chance for a healthy embryo to implant and grow.
Although most clinics monitor the ultrasound appearance of the endometrium (the lining of a woman’s uterus) this does not always reflect the hormonal, immunologic and nutritional environment where the embryo is expected to implant and grow. In 1998 a study [r2] demonstrated that a small amount of the hormone called “human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) can be placed into the uterus and trigger a cascade of events that improve implantation. In fact, we now understand that process of “implantation” involves the embryo being “engulfed” as the tissue grows up and around the embryo. hCG promotes that process to take place. This same critical hormone promotes beneficial changes in the uterine muscle and the immune cells in the uterus necessary to enhance pregnancy.
A recent study [r3] measured the effect of putting a small drop containing 500 IU of hCG in the uterus immediately before an embryo transfer. They demonstrated about a 30% improvement in implantation and on-going pregnancy in women that received this treatment. They also tested smaller doses and found no improvement—further supporting that a crucial level of hCG is necessary to induce this measured benefit. As a result of this information, we are encouraging the use of 500 IU of Intra-uterine hCG as part of our embryo transfer routine.
Robert Greene, MD, FACOG
CNY Fertility Center
e-mail me at rgreene@cnyfertility.com
Call our toll-free number at 800.539.9870 or request a consult here.

3
Apr

Health Matters: Dr. Rob Kiltz on Infertility in the US and Canada

by

Dr. Rob Kiltz appeared on Health Matters in 2012, with others, to discuss many different topics related to infertility in the US and Canada. Watch the video below. If you are a new patient and would like an initial fertility consultation, click here to request a phone or in-office visit, or call us toll free with your questions at 800-539-9870. We have CNY Fertility Center locations in Syracuse, Albany and Rochester, NY.
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{{clearboth}}
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16
Aug

Becoming an Egg Donor: The Recipient is Ready

by

Diane (not her real name) has embarked on the journey of becoming an egg donor at CNY Fertility Center and will share her thoughts during the process in her blog here. If Diane’s journey and stories that she shares compels you to look in to becoming an egg donor we would love to get you started. The first step is to fill out our Donor Eligibility Questionnaire – click here to begin.
The Recipient is Ready:
Today I took another step forward in the process of becoming an egg donor.  Upon arrival today, the visit began much like my last visit.  I first had to once again provide a urine sample and they also had to draw blood again.  We also had to do another ultra sound.  This time the ultra sound was done to determine if my follicles were ready to start the medications that I would be on for the next couple of weeks.  Happily, my follicles looked ready to go and my ovaries were symmetrical in size which meant there were no cysts present.  The presence of a cyst would, evidently, complicate the process a bit.  Luckily everything looked great and the nurses stepped out to determine the exact treatment plan.
A couple of minutes later the nurse returned with a typed up plan and a bag with the medication enclosed.  The nurses decided that I would be starting the follicle stimulating hormones on Saturday and that my next appointment would be Monday.  Monday’s appointment would consist of another blood draw and ultra sound.
The process of starting the medication was simple.  Once a day I would give myself a small injection in my abdomen about one inch away from my belly button.  The nurse had the “pen” (which is basically an apparatus that already contains the medication, a system for dosing it appropriately for each day, and a place for a fresh needle to attach each day).  We went over how to put a clean needle on each day (which was very easy, each needle is in its own small package and just twists into place onto the pen), then how to set the dosage (again, this was very easy; all you have to do is click the appropriate number so it lines up with the big arrow), then she explained where the injection goes, and how to put it in (at a 90 degree angle).  I will be giving myself this particular medicine at this particular dosage for one week.  This medicine will stimulate my body to produce eggs, then I will switch to taking a medicine that will tell my body not to ovulate (as this needs to be timed perfectly with the recipient), and finally I will take a medicine that will tell my body to ovulate at the ideal time.
I came away from today’s appointment armed with new information and a bag of follicle stimulating hormones.  The process, although made easy and as straight forward as possible by the fertility team, is a complex one.  I have to say, I give a lot of credit to couples who endure this process.  I am only getting a tiny glimpse into this as an egg donor.  I can now begin to appreciate the tenacity it takes for couples to go through fertility treatments.  And I also have to give the entire staff at the fertility center a lot of credit as well.  Their jobs are not only to deal with the technical side of hormone levels and lab tests but also the emotional side of this very personal journey.  Bravo to both the families that have gone through fertility treatments and to the fertility teams for making this difficult process as effortless as possible for the couples.
Sincerely,
Diane

15
Aug

April's Journey to Fertility: Where to Keep the Focus

by

April is a CNY Fertility Center patient and has been on her journey to fertility for approximately three years. April will share candid stories and a unique perspective on the fertility challenges many women and couples face. CNY Fertility Center has locations in Syracuse, Albany and Rochester, NY.

Week 76: Where to Keep the Focus
I have always had the internal struggle over what to do with my mind when I am in a current cycle.  Do I focus on what I am doing now, which could be anything including well-timed sex to IVF to exploring adoption, or do I focus on future options just in case the current procedure doesn’t work? I wish I had an answer for this because being positive during each cycle has always been a challenge for me.  The fear that I could psych myself up only to be let down has been like a hovering cloud for years. I do know, however, that the “carrot” of having other options to pursue has always been a bit of a comfort for me.
Since I strongly believe there is no right or wrong answer, let me simply remind you of this. Having a plan is incredibly grounding when you are in the midst of fertility treatments, which can be overwhelming and demanding. So why not take a look at your options and make a list. Begin by acknowledging what you have already done and give yourself and your partner credit for all of the energy and time put into past cycles. Then begin a detailed list of what comes next. You may want to do this with your partner; or perhaps you could each create a list and see how the two compare. I would definitely be specific (i.e.,  3 IUI cycles, consult appointment with doctor, 1 IVF cycle then consult with doctor again, 2 more IVF cycles then revisit adoption and/or another consult with doctor, etc.) but realize that your plans may change. For example when we did not even make it to transfer for our first IVF cycle, we had some serious re-thinking and re-planning to do.
Being focused is a result of being anchored, and I do believe that no matter what is in your fertility plan, the simple fact that you have one can be comforting. I suggest you spend some time perusing CNY’s comprehensive website. Read through some of the Success Stories to see how those women and couples ultimately reached their goal of parenthood. And don’t be afraid to explore methods that you may not have considered before you began this journey.
Staying focused,
April all Year
15
Aug

Seeking Egg Donors of Indian Descent

by

If you are a healthy woman between the age of 21 and 32, we hope you will consider becoming an egg donor. At CNY Fertility Centers we have an immediate need for egg donors that are of Indian descent. All applicants are welcome. With locations in Syracuse, Albany and Rochester, NY we are one of the region’s most respected and successful fertility centers. Currently interviewing young women ages 21-32 to anonymously donate their extra eggs, giving infertile couples and women a chance to have children. The procedure does not involve surrogacy and no medical expenses are incurred. There is currently no waiting list for recipients.
Donors will be compensated $4000 at the end of their egg donation cycle.
For more information and to get started becoming an egg donor:
You can begin our online process immediately by visiting this link: http://cnyfertility.com/become-an-egg-donor-start-here/
Or if you have questions you can contact our Egg Donor Coordinator directly via e-mail at donor@cnyfertility.com. You can also call our offices toll free 800.539.9870.
Visit our website for more information about CNY Fertility Center www.cnyfertility.com

8
Jul

Secondary Infertility: Is it Affecting You?

by

Secondary infertility is defined as the inability to become pregnant or to carry a full-term pregnancy after previously having had one or more children without trouble. This means that you did not use any assisted reproductive technologies or fertility medications when conceiving your existing child or children.
Secondary infertility requires a unique method of support, separate from general infertility support. Emotions associated with the experience of secondary infertility often include a mix of:

  • Anger
  • Guilt
  • Worry
  • Depression
  • Loss
  • Grief
  • Confusion
  • Isolation
  • Jealousy
  • Powerlessness
  • Self-blame

 
Many parents feel guilty for wanting another child so badly, especially if they already have more than one child. This guilt is entirely misplaced. You can absolutely love your existing child or children, but still yearn for more kids – it doesn’t have to be one or the other.
Unfortunately, couples with secondary infertility tend to receive less support from friends, family and even doctors than couples who were never able to conceive. This often happens because couples who already have one or more children do not have a visible loss to explain their grief, whereas couples who have no children are clearly lacking the family they wish for.
Because of this common disparity, couples often need help from professionals and/or support groups when coping with secondary infertility. We at CNY Fertility know how difficult it is to deal with what could have been and what actually is, which is why we encourage you to seek support throughout your struggles. Lisa Stack, Support Coordinator at CNY Fertility Centers, is available to assist you in any way that you may need. Please feel free to contact her (information below) and work through your unique situation.
Lisa Stack
Lstack@cnyfertility.com
315-744-8073

14
Jun

Fertility Drugs: A Quick Overview of Gonadtropins

by

The term gonad describes an organ that produces sex cells (or gametes) such as sperm or egg. Thus, a woman’s ovaries and a man’s testes are both called gonads. Gonadotropins are hormones secreted by your pituitary gland that stimulate the growth and activity of your gonads. Therefore, these hormones play a part in egg and sperm production, as well as the development of physical traits like your voice, muscle, hair and breasts.
Your body naturally produces two kinds of gonadotropins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). These hormones are necessary for ovulation – the production of eggs. A woman may naturally have low hormone levels and be unable to ovulate. To boost hormone levels, a patient undergoing fertility treatment is often given scheduled injections of gonadotropin fertility drugs.
There are three classes of these fertility drugs: human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). hMG contains natural amounts of FSH and LH, while rFSH is created in the laboratory. Both are used to aid in the development of eggs. Once this happens, hCG acts similar to LH and is used to stimulate ovulation.
Right now you’re probably wondering how the heck to process all of these names, so let me break it down for you. Without enough FSH and LH, a woman cannot ovulate properly and requires hormone supplements like hMG, rFSH and hCG. Unfortunately, when you are prescribed one of these supplements, it won’t go by its generic name, but by a specific brand name. The most commonly used hMG is Bravelle or Repronex, rFSH is Follistim or Gonal-F, and hCG is Novarell, Ovidrel or Pregnyl.
These hormone supplements are often used in combination with other fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization or intrauterine insemination. For more information on the process of using gonadotropins, click here. For more on the side effects of using gonadotropins, click here.

12
May

Fertility Authority honors our Greta Killmer as Nurse of the Month

by

Greta Killmer, who works at CNY Fertility in Albany, NY, has specialized in infertility for seven years. As a fertility clinic nurse, she monitors patients’ cycles with ultrasound, performs blood work, intrauterine inseminations (IUIs) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryo transfers, as well as provides patient education.
She was nominated Nurse of the Month at FertilityAuthority.com by a client and we were just notified that she was chosen for the month of May 2011. We are so very proud of Greta. Congratulations!!
Read the entire article here.
Nominate Your Nurse:
In honor of these hard working nurses who hold our hands throughout our treatment experiences, FertilityAuthority.com will feature a dedicated infertility clinic nurse each month. You can nominate your favorite clinic nurse by clicking here.

31
Dec

The Effects of Ovarian Cysts on Fertility

by

Ovarian cysts are small sacs that develop inside or on the surface of a woman’s ovaries. They can vary in size and contain thin or thick fluid, blood or tissue. Ovarian cysts are very common — the majority of women develop at least one ovarian cyst before they reach menopause. Most of these women won’t even realize it because the cysts are a perfectly normal part of the reproductive process. In fact, the follicle that forms around a woman’s egg while it matures is a special type of ovarian cyst.
95% of ovarian cysts are benign (not cancerous) and most are functional in nature. They generally disappear on their own within weeks to months, or can be removed rather painlessly. However, some can cause complications and can occasionally indicate a reproductive problem, which can interfere with a woman’s fertility.
Ovarian cysts that affect fertility:

  • Endometriomas – cysts that form in women with endometriosis, a condition in which the tissue that normally lines a woman’s uterus grows outside the uterus. These cysts can cause pain during menstruation and sexual intercourse. Endometriomas as often called “chocolate cysts” due to the color of the fluid within many of them (old dark blood).
  • Ovarian cysts resulting from polycystic ovaries – sometimes the follicle that is meant to burst open and release the egg for fertilization does not and it turns into a cyst. More and more cysts can then begin to form, eventually building up all over the ovaries and possibly affecting the woman’s fertility. This is a symptom of a condition known as Polycycstic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

Ovarian cysts that do not affect fertility:

  • Functional cysts – these are the most common type of ovarian cyst and do not cause or contribute to infertility. In fact, functional cysts indicate that all necessary, healthy processes leading to fertility are taking place. They occur during ovulation and often disappear painlessly through menstruation. However, some may rupture, twist, or bleed, possibly causing severe pelvic pain. These cannot occur during menopause.
  • Cystadenomas – a cyst that develops from cells from the outer part of the ovary. They are normally not cancerous, but may need to be surgically removed. Cystadenomas can become very large and may measure 12 inches or more in diameter.
  • Dermoid cysts – these contain tissue from a person’s skin, hair, teeth, or other abnormal structure, rather than fluid or blood.

If you are concerned or have questions about any of the above, please don’t hesitate to contact us. You can call us at 1.800.539.9870 or send us your questions through our message form here.

Success Stories

9
Jul

Melissa Brisman Speaks About Legal Issues Surrounding Surrogacy – Web TV: July, 9, 2014

by

Melissa Brisman, Reproductive Lawyer - Guest Blog Post on CNY Fertility CenterWatch Melissa Brisman speak tonight on the legal issues surrounding surrogacy nationwide. Live tonight 7/9 at 6pm EST on Arise America with Debbye Turner Bell. Please tune in! 

Watch live on www.Arise.tv 
PROGRAM: Arise America with Debbye Turner Bell 
GUEST: Melissa Brisman, Esq. 
TOPIC: Legal Issues Surrounding Surrogacy Nationwide 
AIR TIME: 6pm – 7pm EST 

~~

Melissa B. Brisman, Esq., LLC
One Paragon Drive, Suite 158
Montvale, NJ 07645
201-505-0099
201-505-0097 Fax
www.reproductivelawyer.com

Melissa B. Brisman, Owner
Reproductive Possibilities, LLC and Surrogate Fund Management, LLC
One Paragon Drive, Suite 160
Montvale, NJ 07645
Phone: 201-505-0078
Fax:  201-505-0994
www.reproductivepossibilities.com

www.surrogatefundmanagement.com

Follow her on Twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/melissabrisman
Follow her on Facebook @ Melissa Brisman

{{hrule}}

If you are interested in an initial fertility consultation with CNY Fertility Centers either over the phone (if you live out of the NY State region) or in-office, please call our toll-free number at 800.539.9870 or request a consult here.

If you have questions or comments relating to this post, please contact our office.
17
Jan

Intra-uterine hCG at Embryo Transfer: “Jump-Starting” the Implantation Process

by

Dr Robert Greene - CNY Fertility CenterDuring the IVF process, the emphasis has traditionally been on creating the best possible embryos for transfer. Although this embryo based approach has lead to a steady improvement in pregnancy rates for IVF patients; success rates have reached a plateau during the last decade. It seems appropriate therefore that we now step back and devote similar efforts to bolster implantation by improving the receptivity of a woman’s uterus. Such was the recommendation of a 2006 review article [r1] that suggested in its title that the “…endometrium is a fertility determining factor.” Yet only recently have practical ideas verified how we can optimize the chance for a healthy embryo to implant and grow.
Although most clinics monitor the ultrasound appearance of the endometrium (the lining of a woman’s uterus) this does not always reflect the hormonal, immunologic and nutritional environment where the embryo is expected to implant and grow. In 1998 a study [r2] demonstrated that a small amount of the hormone called “human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) can be placed into the uterus and trigger a cascade of events that improve implantation. In fact, we now understand that process of “implantation” involves the embryo being “engulfed” as the tissue grows up and around the embryo. hCG promotes that process to take place. This same critical hormone promotes beneficial changes in the uterine muscle and the immune cells in the uterus necessary to enhance pregnancy.
A recent study [r3] measured the effect of putting a small drop containing 500 IU of hCG in the uterus immediately before an embryo transfer. They demonstrated about a 30% improvement in implantation and on-going pregnancy in women that received this treatment. They also tested smaller doses and found no improvement—further supporting that a crucial level of hCG is necessary to induce this measured benefit. As a result of this information, we are encouraging the use of 500 IU of Intra-uterine hCG as part of our embryo transfer routine.
Robert Greene, MD, FACOG
CNY Fertility Center
e-mail me at rgreene@cnyfertility.com
Call our toll-free number at 800.539.9870 or request a consult here.

3
Apr

Health Matters: Dr. Rob Kiltz on Infertility in the US and Canada

by

Dr. Rob Kiltz appeared on Health Matters in 2012, with others, to discuss many different topics related to infertility in the US and Canada. Watch the video below. If you are a new patient and would like an initial fertility consultation, click here to request a phone or in-office visit, or call us toll free with your questions at 800-539-9870. We have CNY Fertility Center locations in Syracuse, Albany and Rochester, NY.
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{{clearboth}}
{{hrule}}

16
Aug

Becoming an Egg Donor: The Recipient is Ready

by

Diane (not her real name) has embarked on the journey of becoming an egg donor at CNY Fertility Center and will share her thoughts during the process in her blog here. If Diane’s journey and stories that she shares compels you to look in to becoming an egg donor we would love to get you started. The first step is to fill out our Donor Eligibility Questionnaire – click here to begin.
The Recipient is Ready:
Today I took another step forward in the process of becoming an egg donor.  Upon arrival today, the visit began much like my last visit.  I first had to once again provide a urine sample and they also had to draw blood again.  We also had to do another ultra sound.  This time the ultra sound was done to determine if my follicles were ready to start the medications that I would be on for the next couple of weeks.  Happily, my follicles looked ready to go and my ovaries were symmetrical in size which meant there were no cysts present.  The presence of a cyst would, evidently, complicate the process a bit.  Luckily everything looked great and the nurses stepped out to determine the exact treatment plan.
A couple of minutes later the nurse returned with a typed up plan and a bag with the medication enclosed.  The nurses decided that I would be starting the follicle stimulating hormones on Saturday and that my next appointment would be Monday.  Monday’s appointment would consist of another blood draw and ultra sound.
The process of starting the medication was simple.  Once a day I would give myself a small injection in my abdomen about one inch away from my belly button.  The nurse had the “pen” (which is basically an apparatus that already contains the medication, a system for dosing it appropriately for each day, and a place for a fresh needle to attach each day).  We went over how to put a clean needle on each day (which was very easy, each needle is in its own small package and just twists into place onto the pen), then how to set the dosage (again, this was very easy; all you have to do is click the appropriate number so it lines up with the big arrow), then she explained where the injection goes, and how to put it in (at a 90 degree angle).  I will be giving myself this particular medicine at this particular dosage for one week.  This medicine will stimulate my body to produce eggs, then I will switch to taking a medicine that will tell my body not to ovulate (as this needs to be timed perfectly with the recipient), and finally I will take a medicine that will tell my body to ovulate at the ideal time.
I came away from today’s appointment armed with new information and a bag of follicle stimulating hormones.  The process, although made easy and as straight forward as possible by the fertility team, is a complex one.  I have to say, I give a lot of credit to couples who endure this process.  I am only getting a tiny glimpse into this as an egg donor.  I can now begin to appreciate the tenacity it takes for couples to go through fertility treatments.  And I also have to give the entire staff at the fertility center a lot of credit as well.  Their jobs are not only to deal with the technical side of hormone levels and lab tests but also the emotional side of this very personal journey.  Bravo to both the families that have gone through fertility treatments and to the fertility teams for making this difficult process as effortless as possible for the couples.
Sincerely,
Diane

15
Aug

April's Journey to Fertility: Where to Keep the Focus

by

April is a CNY Fertility Center patient and has been on her journey to fertility for approximately three years. April will share candid stories and a unique perspective on the fertility challenges many women and couples face. CNY Fertility Center has locations in Syracuse, Albany and Rochester, NY.

Week 76: Where to Keep the Focus
I have always had the internal struggle over what to do with my mind when I am in a current cycle.  Do I focus on what I am doing now, which could be anything including well-timed sex to IVF to exploring adoption, or do I focus on future options just in case the current procedure doesn’t work? I wish I had an answer for this because being positive during each cycle has always been a challenge for me.  The fear that I could psych myself up only to be let down has been like a hovering cloud for years. I do know, however, that the “carrot” of having other options to pursue has always been a bit of a comfort for me.
Since I strongly believe there is no right or wrong answer, let me simply remind you of this. Having a plan is incredibly grounding when you are in the midst of fertility treatments, which can be overwhelming and demanding. So why not take a look at your options and make a list. Begin by acknowledging what you have already done and give yourself and your partner credit for all of the energy and time put into past cycles. Then begin a detailed list of what comes next. You may want to do this with your partner; or perhaps you could each create a list and see how the two compare. I would definitely be specific (i.e.,  3 IUI cycles, consult appointment with doctor, 1 IVF cycle then consult with doctor again, 2 more IVF cycles then revisit adoption and/or another consult with doctor, etc.) but realize that your plans may change. For example when we did not even make it to transfer for our first IVF cycle, we had some serious re-thinking and re-planning to do.
Being focused is a result of being anchored, and I do believe that no matter what is in your fertility plan, the simple fact that you have one can be comforting. I suggest you spend some time perusing CNY’s comprehensive website. Read through some of the Success Stories to see how those women and couples ultimately reached their goal of parenthood. And don’t be afraid to explore methods that you may not have considered before you began this journey.
Staying focused,
April all Year
15
Aug

Seeking Egg Donors of Indian Descent

by

If you are a healthy woman between the age of 21 and 32, we hope you will consider becoming an egg donor. At CNY Fertility Centers we have an immediate need for egg donors that are of Indian descent. All applicants are welcome. With locations in Syracuse, Albany and Rochester, NY we are one of the region’s most respected and successful fertility centers. Currently interviewing young women ages 21-32 to anonymously donate their extra eggs, giving infertile couples and women a chance to have children. The procedure does not involve surrogacy and no medical expenses are incurred. There is currently no waiting list for recipients.
Donors will be compensated $4000 at the end of their egg donation cycle.
For more information and to get started becoming an egg donor:
You can begin our online process immediately by visiting this link: http://cnyfertility.com/become-an-egg-donor-start-here/
Or if you have questions you can contact our Egg Donor Coordinator directly via e-mail at donor@cnyfertility.com. You can also call our offices toll free 800.539.9870.
Visit our website for more information about CNY Fertility Center www.cnyfertility.com

8
Jul

Secondary Infertility: Is it Affecting You?

by

Secondary infertility is defined as the inability to become pregnant or to carry a full-term pregnancy after previously having had one or more children without trouble. This means that you did not use any assisted reproductive technologies or fertility medications when conceiving your existing child or children.
Secondary infertility requires a unique method of support, separate from general infertility support. Emotions associated with the experience of secondary infertility often include a mix of:

  • Anger
  • Guilt
  • Worry
  • Depression
  • Loss
  • Grief
  • Confusion
  • Isolation
  • Jealousy
  • Powerlessness
  • Self-blame

 
Many parents feel guilty for wanting another child so badly, especially if they already have more than one child. This guilt is entirely misplaced. You can absolutely love your existing child or children, but still yearn for more kids – it doesn’t have to be one or the other.
Unfortunately, couples with secondary infertility tend to receive less support from friends, family and even doctors than couples who were never able to conceive. This often happens because couples who already have one or more children do not have a visible loss to explain their grief, whereas couples who have no children are clearly lacking the family they wish for.
Because of this common disparity, couples often need help from professionals and/or support groups when coping with secondary infertility. We at CNY Fertility know how difficult it is to deal with what could have been and what actually is, which is why we encourage you to seek support throughout your struggles. Lisa Stack, Support Coordinator at CNY Fertility Centers, is available to assist you in any way that you may need. Please feel free to contact her (information below) and work through your unique situation.
Lisa Stack
Lstack@cnyfertility.com
315-744-8073

14
Jun

Fertility Drugs: A Quick Overview of Gonadtropins

by

The term gonad describes an organ that produces sex cells (or gametes) such as sperm or egg. Thus, a woman’s ovaries and a man’s testes are both called gonads. Gonadotropins are hormones secreted by your pituitary gland that stimulate the growth and activity of your gonads. Therefore, these hormones play a part in egg and sperm production, as well as the development of physical traits like your voice, muscle, hair and breasts.
Your body naturally produces two kinds of gonadotropins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). These hormones are necessary for ovulation – the production of eggs. A woman may naturally have low hormone levels and be unable to ovulate. To boost hormone levels, a patient undergoing fertility treatment is often given scheduled injections of gonadotropin fertility drugs.
There are three classes of these fertility drugs: human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). hMG contains natural amounts of FSH and LH, while rFSH is created in the laboratory. Both are used to aid in the development of eggs. Once this happens, hCG acts similar to LH and is used to stimulate ovulation.
Right now you’re probably wondering how the heck to process all of these names, so let me break it down for you. Without enough FSH and LH, a woman cannot ovulate properly and requires hormone supplements like hMG, rFSH and hCG. Unfortunately, when you are prescribed one of these supplements, it won’t go by its generic name, but by a specific brand name. The most commonly used hMG is Bravelle or Repronex, rFSH is Follistim or Gonal-F, and hCG is Novarell, Ovidrel or Pregnyl.
These hormone supplements are often used in combination with other fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization or intrauterine insemination. For more information on the process of using gonadotropins, click here. For more on the side effects of using gonadotropins, click here.

12
May

Fertility Authority honors our Greta Killmer as Nurse of the Month

by

Greta Killmer, who works at CNY Fertility in Albany, NY, has specialized in infertility for seven years. As a fertility clinic nurse, she monitors patients’ cycles with ultrasound, performs blood work, intrauterine inseminations (IUIs) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryo transfers, as well as provides patient education.
She was nominated Nurse of the Month at FertilityAuthority.com by a client and we were just notified that she was chosen for the month of May 2011. We are so very proud of Greta. Congratulations!!
Read the entire article here.
Nominate Your Nurse:
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31
Dec

The Effects of Ovarian Cysts on Fertility

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Ovarian cysts are small sacs that develop inside or on the surface of a woman’s ovaries. They can vary in size and contain thin or thick fluid, blood or tissue. Ovarian cysts are very common — the majority of women develop at least one ovarian cyst before they reach menopause. Most of these women won’t even realize it because the cysts are a perfectly normal part of the reproductive process. In fact, the follicle that forms around a woman’s egg while it matures is a special type of ovarian cyst.
95% of ovarian cysts are benign (not cancerous) and most are functional in nature. They generally disappear on their own within weeks to months, or can be removed rather painlessly. However, some can cause complications and can occasionally indicate a reproductive problem, which can interfere with a woman’s fertility.
Ovarian cysts that affect fertility:

  • Endometriomas – cysts that form in women with endometriosis, a condition in which the tissue that normally lines a woman’s uterus grows outside the uterus. These cysts can cause pain during menstruation and sexual intercourse. Endometriomas as often called “chocolate cysts” due to the color of the fluid within many of them (old dark blood).
  • Ovarian cysts resulting from polycystic ovaries – sometimes the follicle that is meant to burst open and release the egg for fertilization does not and it turns into a cyst. More and more cysts can then begin to form, eventually building up all over the ovaries and possibly affecting the woman’s fertility. This is a symptom of a condition known as Polycycstic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

Ovarian cysts that do not affect fertility:

  • Functional cysts – these are the most common type of ovarian cyst and do not cause or contribute to infertility. In fact, functional cysts indicate that all necessary, healthy processes leading to fertility are taking place. They occur during ovulation and often disappear painlessly through menstruation. However, some may rupture, twist, or bleed, possibly causing severe pelvic pain. These cannot occur during menopause.
  • Cystadenomas – a cyst that develops from cells from the outer part of the ovary. They are normally not cancerous, but may need to be surgically removed. Cystadenomas can become very large and may measure 12 inches or more in diameter.
  • Dermoid cysts – these contain tissue from a person’s skin, hair, teeth, or other abnormal structure, rather than fluid or blood.

If you are concerned or have questions about any of the above, please don’t hesitate to contact us. You can call us at 1.800.539.9870 or send us your questions through our message form here.